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How to Photograph Your Music Box

Copyright 2006 Monique Hawkins Many antique and music box lovers enjoy collecting musical jewelry boxes, carousel music boxes, wooden keepsake boxes, and other musical gifts. There are some music box and antique collectors who are interested in photographing their boxes. Reasons to take pictures include desiring to preserve details of musical pieces, which collectors have had, and as a way to exchange information with others who are interested. Also, if one has a very valuable and expensive collection, photographs might be needed for insurance purposes (think natural disasters like Hurricane Katrina). That said; let's look into how to photograph a music box. Since many cameras today are of very good quality and can do most of the work, collectors might think it is quite easy to take a photograph with little probability of making a mistake.

The truth is, there is still some necessary steps to take to avoid mistakes. For example, one step to remember is to take picture in a bright and even natural light; flash can be used to "fill in" for a dark side. If one desires a professional effect, music boxes can be set up on tables covered with a white or a neutral colored sheet that is draped over the table. One might also want to pin up the sheet on the wall behind the table, as this will remove extraneous details of objects behind the box. To illuminate the box, place a large sheet of white paper vertical on each side of the table a few feet from the box.

Shining a bright light at the paper is what causes the music box to look illuminated. It is also important to plan for your picture. Take a few pictures to see what they look like. Carefully frame the picture in the viewfinder and look at the corners to make sure you have what you want. Also, take your time and avoid a common mistake of not remembering where the center of the picture is. For the music box and antique collector who take video pictures, avoid tinkling with the camcorder while the music box is playing. This can impact the recoding. Minimum movement and camera effect is necessary. Avoid a running commentary as well and don?t zoon in and out on every shot. Follow these suggestions whether you have antique music boxes, inlaid music boxes, musical jewelry boxes, carousel music boxes, wooden keepsake boxes, or any other type of music box and be well on your way to creating some really great music box photographs.


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