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Music - Singing - Duet - Quartet

Harmony - Backup Singers - Lead Vocals - Vocalists






Let Him Hear Singing

RRP $15.99

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Let Him Hear Singing is a book of modern poetry with a significantly Christian flavor. The author's broad experience and far-reaching interests have resulted in a rich, many-colored tapestry of poems with wide-ranging themes including children's stories, modern science, evolution, environmental concerns, and aspects of his life and heritage as a Southerner with deep roots in the mountains of East Tennessee. His insights and expression are genuine and clear, his scope is far-reaching, and while the Christian message and hope are the central theme throughout this book, it has many diversions into the nooks and crannies of life -- well spoken and sometimes intense, but also fluid and moving. A sparkling volume from cover to cover. This is an ideal choice for book clubs, Christian groups, and individuals who want to be entertained, nurtured and challenged in their reading material. 124 pages.


Foundations In Singing W/keyboard Fold-out Mandatory Pkg

RRP $30.99

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A practical, effective combination of textbook and song anthology, "Foundations in Singing" helps students master the essentials of vocal technique. Addressing the particular needs of beginners, the positive language provides encouragement while the solid pedagogy and wide selection of songs promote understanding. In the new eighth edition, vocal health, formerly Chapter 11, has been moved to an earlier position, Chapter 6, and song contents were expanded. Twelve titles, several in two keys, are new to this edition, including Jeanine Tesori, who wrote new songs for the 2001 production of "Thoroughly Modern Millie," poet Langston Hughes and composers H. T. Burleigh, Margaret Bonds and Duke Ellington. A Mexican popular standard, "Sabor a mi," is included for the first time.


A Practical Discourse On Some Principles Of Hymn-singing

RRP $16.99

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An excerpt from the beginning of the book:

What St. Augustin says of the emotion which he felt on hearing the music in the Portian basilica at Milan in the year 386 has always seemed to me a good illustration of the relativity of musical expression; I mean how much more its ethical significance depends on the musical experience of the hearer, than on any special accomplishment or intrinsic development of the art. Knowing of what kind that music must have been and how few resources of expression it can have had,-being rudimental in form, without suggestion of harmony, and in its performance unskilful, its probably nasal voice-production unmodified by any accompaniment,-one marvels at his description,

'What tears I shed at Thy hymns and canticles, how acutely was my soul stirred by the voices and sweet music of Thy Church! As those voices entered my ears, truth distilled in my heart, and thence divine affection welled up in a flood, in tears o'erflowing, and happy was I in those tears.'

St. Augustin appears to have witnessed the beginnings of the great music of the Western Church. It was the year of his baptism when, he tells us, singing was introduced at Milan to cheer the Catholics who had shut themselves up in the basilica with their bishop, to defend him from the imperial violence:

'It was then instituted that psalms and hymns should be sung, after the manner of the Eastern Churches, lest the folk in the weariness of their grief should altogether lose heart: and from that day to this the custom has been retained; many, nay, nearly all Thy flocks, in all regions of the world, following the example.'

What great emotional power St. Augustin attributed to ecclesiastical music, and of what importance he thought it, may be seen in the tenth book of the Confessions: he is there examining himself under the heads of the senses, and after the sense of smell, his chapter on the sense of hearing is as follows:-

'The lust of the ears entangled and enslaved me more firmly, but Thou hast loosened and set me free. But even now I confess that I do yield a very little to the beauty of those sounds which are animated by Thy eloquence, when sung with a sweet and practised voice; not, indeed, so far that I am limed and cannot fly off at pleasure1: and yield though I do, yet these sweet sounds, joined with the divine words which are their life, cannot be admitted to my heart save to a place of some dignity, and I hesitate to give them one as lofty as their claim.

For sometimes I seem to myself to be allowing them undue honour, when I feel that our minds are really moved to a warmer devotion and more ardent piety by the holy words themselves when they are so sung than when they are not so sung; and when I recognize that all the various moods of our spirit have their proper tones in speech and song, by which they are, through I know not what secret familiarity, excited. But the mere sensuous delight, to which it is not fitting to resign the mind to be enervated thereby, often deceives me, whenever (that is) the delight of the senses does not so accompany the reason as to be cheerfully in submission thereto, but, having been admitted only for reason's sake, then even attempts to go before and to lead. Thus I sin without knowing, but afterwards I know.



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Music Singing Duet Quartet
Harmony Backup Singers Lead Vocals Vocalists
Choir

Harmonology





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